Training your puppy-dog the right way,  and raise a well-behaved dog that everyone loves.



Boundaries, regular exercise and discipline are important factors when it comes to training your canine friend. Puppies are cute and adorable; chewing on everything in sight and welcoming friends and family with bundles of enthusiasm can be a source of great enjoyment.

However, you have to remember that your cute bundle of joy will soon grow to be an adult dog, which means that cute puppy type behaviour is not so cute once the puppy stage is over.

Which is why training your canine friend as soon as possible is so important. It may initially seem like a daunting task, but well worth the effort in the long-run. In addition, your puppy will start to respect you more and also see you as a pack leader which will only raise the level of your canine-human relationship.

​4 Rules for Successful House Training


Whether it is toilet training, going for a walk, food training or simply good house training skills, we encourage you to consider the following starting points:

1.    Regular Practice: Puppies need plenty of practice to help them become familiar with new habits. It will take a little time, but pretty soon it will become familiar and natural for them.
2.     Patience & Self Control – If there’s one thing your canine friend does extremely well unknowingly to them, is to try your patience. Please don’t take it personally; raise your voice, shout or lose your temper or get physically rough. You will need patience to help your pup establish their routine. They simply can't do it on their own. With patience, discipline and a regular routine, you will help your pup achieve some really good results.
3.    Praise Where It’s Due: Animals (just like humans) love to get their fair share of attention and praise. After each positive step, praise your pup with an excited voice, while patting him gently on the head. Praise acts as a great motivator.
4.    Rewards:  It's important to offer a treat for good behaviour which will reinforce a sense of accomplishment and motivate them to keep repeating the good behaviour. Never treat for no reason or when unnecessary.

Tips for Potty Training Your Puppy

Toilet training is essential. Remember, smaller breed puppies have smaller bladders and will need to relieve themselves more often. Also, you need to keep the age of your puppy in mind.

Until your puppy matures further they will probably need to go to the toilet as often as every 1-2 hours. This can be very trying at first, but remember it takes patience.

In addition, puppies need to go to the bathroom at least 15-20 minutes after eating, 5-10 minutes after drinking or after a play session or waking up. This may vary, so you will need to keep a watchful eye over your pup. Don’t discipline your pup if they make a mistake, just keep calm, and don’t shout. Remember, they are still learning.

Keep these tips in mind when toilet training your puppy:

  • check
    ​Be patient, keep a record of their eating and going to the toilet habits, learn their routine, this will provide a good starting point and you should be able to anticipate their next toilet break. 
  • check
     Give them boundaries, otherwise, they will wander through the house looking for a place to toilet. Use training pads and when they do make a mess, clean up straightaway, with disinfectant. The smell will put them off from going again in the same spot.
  • check
    Try and take the puppy to the toilet in the same location each time, especially if you have a garden.  If possible designate a space for them to toilet and make sure to praise and reward with a treat when they are obedient.  

​Good Eating Habits

  • check
    ​Decide the quantity of food that needs to be given to your dog in a day. Divide that quantity into 2-3 meals.
  • check
    Have a ritual. Ask your dog, “Are you hungry?”, “Where’s your food?”, “Where’s the bowl?”, “Now, stay on your mat.” Put down the food and count to five.
  • check
    Your dog should start eating while you count slowly from one to five. If you have already counted to five and your dog hasn’t touched the bowl, pick it up and put the food away.
  • check
    Give him nothing else, until his next meal. This will train your dog to know when to expect his next meal and will also dissuade him from begging for scraps at the dinner table.  
  • check
    Tips - Some older dogs show aggression and become snappy when you are near their food bowl. To stop this habit from developing in your pup,  during feeding, start to place your hand near the bowl, in the bowl and even take the food away while they are eating. This will provide a positive experience and won't be perceived as any type of threat. The end result should be that if you do go near their bowl or even take it away, they will stop and wait patiently for you to return their food.

Training your puppy dog will be tiresome and hard work but do preserve. When done consistently over a period of time you will eventually be rewarded with a puppy-dog that is well-behaved and a joy to be around Remember, 90% of your dogs’ behaviour will ultimately depend on your commitment to your new canine friend.

Train your puppy and raise a well-behaved dog that everyone loves.


Boundaries, regular exercise and discipline are important factors when it comes to training your canine friend. Puppies are cute and adorable; chewing on everything in sight and welcoming friends and family with bundles of enthusiasm can be a source of great enjoyment.

However, you have to remember that your cute bundle of joy will soon grow to be an adult dog, which means that cute puppy type behaviour is not so cute once the puppy stage is over.

Which is why training your canine friend as soon as possible is so important. It may initially seem like a daunting task, but well worth the effort in the long-run. In addition, your puppy will start to respect you more and also see you as a pack leader which will only raise the level of your canine-human relationship.

4 Rules for Successful House Training

Whether it is toilet training, going for a walk, food training or simply good house training skills, we encourage you to consider the following starting points:

1.    Regular Practice: Puppies need plenty of practice to help them become familiar with new habits. It will take a little time, but pretty soon it will become familiar and natural for them.
2.     Patience & Self Control – If there’s one thing your canine friend does extremely well unknowingly to them, is to try your patience. Please don’t take it personally; raise your voice, shout or lose your temper or get physically rough. You will need patience to help your pup establish their routine. They simply can't do it on their own. With patience, discipline and a regular routine, you will help your pup achieve some really good results.
3.    Praise Where It’s Due: Animals (just like humans) love to get their fair share of attention and praise. After each positive step, praise your pup with an excited voice, while patting him gently on the head. Praise acts as a great motivator.
4.    Rewards:  It's important to offer a treat for good behaviour which will reinforce a sense of accomplishment and motivate them to keep repeating the good behaviour. Never treat for no reason or when unnecessary.

Tips for Potty Training Your Puppy

Toilet training is essential. Remember, smaller breed puppies have smaller bladders and will need to relieve themselves more often. Also, you need to keep the age of your puppy in mind.

Until your puppy matures further they will probably need to go to the toilet as often as every 1-2 hours. This can be very trying at first, but remember it takes patience.

In addition, puppies need to go to the bathroom at least 15-20 minutes after eating, 5-10 minutes after drinking or after a play session or waking up. This may vary, so you will need to keep a watchful eye over your pup. Don’t discipline your pup if they make a mistake, just keep calm, and don’t shout. Remember, they are still learning.

Keep these tips in mind when toilet training your puppy:

•    Be patient, keep a record of their eating and going to the toilet habits, learn their routine, this will provide a good starting point and you should be able to anticipate their next toilet break.
•    Give them boundaries, otherwise, they will wander through the house looking for a place to toilet. Use training pads and when they do make a mess, clean up straightaway, with disinfectant. The smell will put them off from going again in the same spot.
•    Try and take the puppy to the toilet in the same location each time, especially if you have a garden.  If possible designate a space for them to toilet and make sure to praise and reward with a treat when they are obedient.  


Good Eating Habits

•    Decide the quantity of food that needs to be given to your dog in a day. Divide that quantity into 2-3 meals.
•    Have a ritual. Ask your dog, “Are you hungry?”, “Where’s your food?”, “Where’s the bowl?”, “Now, stay on your mat.” Put down the food and count to five.
•    Your dog should start eating while you count slowly from one to five. If you have already counted to five and your dog hasn’t touched the bowl, pick it up and put the food away.
•    Give him nothing else, until his next meal. This will train your dog to know when to expect his next meal and will also dissuade him from begging for scraps at the dinner table.  
•    Tips - Some older dogs show aggression and become snappy when you are near their food bowl. To stop this habit from developing in your pup,  during feeding, start to place your hand near the bowl, in the bowl and even take the food away while they are eating. This will provide a positive experience and won't be perceived as any type of threat. The end result should be that if you do go near their bowl or even take it away, they will stop and wait patiently for you to return their food.

Training your puppy dog will be tiresome and hard work but do preserve. When done consistently over a period of time you will eventually be rewarded with a puppy-dog that is well-behaved and a joy to be around Remember, 90% of your dogs’ behaviour will ultimately depend on your commitment to your new canine friend.